The Brewers Dray logo Brewers Dray Testimonial
Beer Styles
Sour Ale
Berliner Weisse
Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.028 – 1.032      IBUs: 3 – 8       FG: 1.004 – 1.006          SRM: 2 – 3       ABV: 2.8 – 3.6%
Ingredients:
Wheat malt content is typically well under 50% of the grist (generally 30%) with the remainder being Pilsner malt.  A symbiotic fermentation with top-fermenting yeast and Lactobacillus delbruckii provides the sharp sourness, which may be enhanced by blending of beers of different ages during fermentation and by extended cool aging.  Low head and carbonation may be incorrectly caused by the yeast’s adverse reaction to elevated levels of lactic acid.  Hop bitterness is extremely low.  A turbid mash is traditional, although some homebrewers use a sour mash.
Aroma:
A sharply sour, somewhat acidic character is dominant.  Can have up to a moderately fruity character.  The fruitiness may increase with age and a flowery character may develop.  A mild Brettanomyces aroma may be present.  No hop aroma, diacetyl, or DMS.
Appearance:
Very pale straw in color.  Clarity ranges from clear to somewhat hazy.  Large, dense, white head.  Always effervescent.
Flavor:
Clean lactic sourness dominates and can be quite strong, although not so acidic as a lambic.  Some complementary bready or grainy wheat flavor is generally noticeable. Hop bitterness is very low.  A mild Brettanomyces character may be detected, as may a restrained fruitiness (both are optional).  No hop flavor.  No diacetyl or DMS.
Mouthfeel:
Light body.  Very dry finish.  High carbonation.  No sensation of alcohol.
Overall Impression:
A very pale, sour, refreshing, low-alcohol wheat ale.
History:
A regional specialty of Berlin; referred to by Napoleon's troops in 1809 as "the Champagne of the North" due to its lively and elegant character.  Only two traditional breweries still produce the product.
Comments:
In Germany, it is classified as a Schankbier denoting a small beer of starting gravity in the range 7-8°P.  Often served with the addition of a shot of sugar syrups (‘mit schuss’) flavored with raspberry (‘himbeer’) or woodruff (‘waldmeister’) or even mixed with Pils to counter the substantial sourness.  Has been described by some as the most purely refreshing beer in the world.
Flanders Red Ale
Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.046 – 1.054      IBUs: 15 – 25       FG: 1.008 – 1.016         SRM: 10 – 16       ABV: 5 – 5.5%
Ingredients:
A base of Vienna and/or Munich malts and a small amount of Special B are used with up to 20% flaked corn or corn grits.  Low alpha acid continental or British hops are commonly used (avoid high alpha or distinctive American hops).  Saccharomyces, Lactobacillus and Brettanomyces (and acetobacters) contribute to the fermentation and eventual flavor.
Aroma:
Complex fruitiness with complementary malt.  Fruitiness is high, and reminiscent of black cherries, oranges, plums or red currants.  There is often some vanilla and/or chocolate notes.  Spicy phenols can be present in low amounts for complexity.  The sour, acidic aroma ranges from complementary to intense.  No hop aroma.  Diacetyl is perceived only in very minor quantities, if at all, as a complementary aroma.
Appearance:
Deep red, burgundy to reddish-brown in color.  Good clarity.  Average to good head retention.
Flavor:
Intense fruitiness commonly includes plum, orange, black cherry or red currant flavors.  A mild vanilla and/or chocolate character is often present.  Spicy phenols can be present in low amounts for complexity.  Sour, acidic character ranges from complementary to intense.  Rich, sweet flavors range from complementary to prominent.  Generally as the sour character increases, the sweet character blends to more of a background flavor (and vice versa).  No hop flavor.  Restrained hop bitterness.  An acidic, tannic bitterness is often present in low to moderate amounts, and adds a red wine-like character.  Diacetyl is perceived only in very minor quantities, if at all, as a complementary flavor.
Mouthfeel:
Medium bodied.  Low to medium carbonation.  Low to medium astringency, like a well-aged red wine, often with a prickly acidity.  Deceivingly light and crisp on the palate although a somewhat sweet finish is not uncommon.
Overall Impression:
A complex, sour, red wine-like Belgian-style ale.
History:
The indigenous beer of West Flanders, typified by the products of the Rodenbach brewery, established in 1820 in West Flanders but reflective of earlier brewing traditions.  The beer is aged for up to two years, often in huge oaken barrels which contain the resident bacteria necessary to sour the beer.  It was once common in Belgium and England to blend old beer with young to balance the sourness and acidity found in aged beer.  While blending of batches for consistency is now common among larger breweries, this type of blending is a fading art.
Comments:
Long aging and blending of young and well-aged beer often occurs, adding to the smoothness and complexity, though the aged product is sometimes released as a connoisseur’s beer.  Known as the Burgundy of Belgium, it is more wine-like than any other beer style.  The reddish color is a product of the malt although an extended, less-than-rolling portion of the boil may help add an attractive Burgundy hue.  Aging will also darken the beer.  The Flanders red is more acetic and the fruity flavors more reminiscent of a red wine than an Oud Bruin.
Flanders Brown Ale/Oud Bruin
Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.043 – 1.077       IBUs: 15 – 25      FG: 1.012 – 1.016          SRM: 15 – 20      ABV: 4 – 8%
Ingredients:
A base of Pils malt with judicious amounts of crystal malt and a tiny bit of black or roast malt.  Low alpha acid continental or British hops are typical (avoid high alpha or distinctive American hops).  Saccharomyces and Lactobacillus (and acetobacters) contribute to the fermentation and eventual flavor.  Lactobacillus reacts poorly to elevated levels of alcohol.  A sour mash or acidulated malt may also be used to develop the sour character without introducing Lactobacillus.  Water high in carbonates is typical of its home region and will buffer the acidity of darker malts and the lactic sourness.  Magnesium in the water accentuates the sourness.
Aroma:
Complex combination of fruity esters and rich malt character.  Esters commonly reminiscent of raisins, plums, figs, dates, black cherries or prunes.  A malt character of caramel, toffee, orange, treacle or chocolate is also common.  Spicy phenols can be present in low amounts for complexity.  A sherry-like character may be present and generally denotes an aged example.  A low sour aroma may be present, and can modestly increase with age but should not grow to a noticeable acetic/vinegary character.  Hop aroma absent.  Diacetyl is perceived only in very minor quantities, if at all, as a complementary aroma.
Appearance:
Dark reddish-brown to brown in color.  Good clarity.  Average to good head retention.
Flavor:
Malty with fruity complexity and some caramelization character.  Fruitiness commonly includes dark fruits such as raisins, plums, figs, dates, black cherries or prunes.  A malt character of caramel, toffee, orange, treacle or chocolate is also common.  Spicy phenols can be present in low amounts for complexity.  A slight sourness often becomes more pronounced in well-aged examples, along with some sherry-like character, producing a “sweet-and-sour” profile.  The sourness should not grow to a notable acetic/vinegary character.  Hop flavor absent.  Restrained hop bitterness.  Low oxidation is appropriate as a point of complexity.  Diacetyl is perceived only in very minor quantities, if at all, as a complementary flavor.
Mouthfeel:
Medium to medium-full body.  Low to moderate carbonation.  No astringency with a sweet and tart finish.
Overall Impression:
A malty, fruity, aged, somewhat sour Belgian-style brown ale.
History:
An “old ale” tradition, indigenous to East Flanders, typified by the products of the Liefman brewery (now owned by Riva), which has roots back to the 1600s.  Historically brewed as a “provision beer” that would develop some sourness as it aged.  These beers were typically more sour than current commercial examples.  While Flanders red beers are aged in oak, the brown beers are not.
Comments:
Long aging and blending of young and aged beer may occur, adding smoothness and complexity and balancing any harsh, sour character.  A deeper malt character distinguishes these beers from Flanders red ales.  This style was designed to lay down so examples with a moderate aged character are considered superior to younger examples.  As in fruit lambics, Oud Bruin can be used as a base for fruit-flavored beers such as kriek (cherries) or frambozen (raspberries), though these should be entered in the classic-style fruit beer category.  The Oud Bruin is less acetic and maltier than a Flanders Red, and the fruity flavors are more malt-oriented.
Straight (Unblended) Lambic
Vital Statistics:
OG:1.040 – 1.054  IBUs: up to 10 (approx) FG: 1.000 – 1.010      SRM: 3 – 7      ABV: 5 – 6.5%
Ingredients:
Unmalted wheat (30-40%), pilsner malt and aged (surannes) hops (3 years) are used.  The aged hops are used more for preservative effects than bitterness, and makes actual bitterness levels difficult to estimate.  Traditionally these beers are spontaneously fermented with naturally-occurring yeast and bacteria in predominately oaken barrels.  Home-brewed and craft-brewed versions are more typically made with pure cultures of yeast commonly including Saccharomyces, Brettanomyces, Pediococcus and Lactobacillus in an attempt to recreate the effects of the dominant microbiota of Brussels and the surrounding countryside of the Senne River valley.  Cultures taken from bottles are sometimes used but there is no simple way of knowing what organisms are still viable.
Aroma:
A decidedly sour/acidic aroma is often dominant in young examples, but may be more subdued with age as it blends with aromas described as barnyard, earthy, goaty, hay, horsey, and horse blanket.  A mild oak and/or citrus aroma is considered favorable.  An enteric, smoky, cigar-like, or cheesy aroma is unfavorable.  Older versions are commonly fruity with aromas of apples or even honey.  No hop aroma.  No diacetyl.
Appearance:
Pale yellow to deep golden in color.  Age tends to darken the beer.  Clarity is hazy to good.  Younger versions are often cloudy, while older ones are generally clear.  Head retention is generally poor.
Flavor:
Young examples are often noticeably sour and/or lactic, but aging can bring this character more in balance with the malt, wheat and barnyard characteristics.  Fruity flavors are simpler in young lambics and more complex in the older examples, where they are reminiscent of apples or other light fruits, rhubarb, or honey.  Some oak or citrus flavor (often grapefruit) is occasionally noticeable.  An enteric, smoky or cigar-like character is undesirable.  Hop bitterness is low to none.  No hop flavor.  No diacetyl.
Mouthfeel:
Light to medium-light body.  In spite of the low finishing gravity, the many mouth-filling flavors prevent the beer from tasting like water.  As a rule of thumb lambic dries with age, which makes dryness a reasonable indicator of age.  Has a medium to high tart, puckering quality without being sharply astringent.  Virtually to completely uncarbonated.
Overall Impression:
Complex, sour/acidic, pale, wheat-based ale fermented by a variety of Belgian microbiota.
History:
Spontaneously fermented sour ales from the area in and around Brussels (the Senne Valley) stem from a farmhouse brewing tradition several centuries old.  Their numbers are constantly dwindling.
Comments:
Straight lambics are single-batch, unblended beers.  Since they are unblended, the straight lambic is often a true product of the “house character” of a brewery and will be more variable than a gueuze.  They are generally served young (6 months) and on tap as cheap, easy-drinking beers without any filling carbonation.  Younger versions tend to be one-dimensionally sour since a complex Brett character often takes upwards of a year to develop.  An enteric character is often indicative of a lambic that is too young.  A noticeable vinegary or cidery character is considered a fault by Belgian brewers.  Since the wild yeast and bacteria will ferment ALL sugars, they are bottled only when they have completely fermented.  Lambic is served uncarbonated, while gueuze is served effervescent.
Gueuze
Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.040 – 1.060    IBUs: up to 10 (approx)      FG: 1.000 – 1.006       SRM: 3 – 7    ABV: 5 – 8%
Ingredients:
Unmalted wheat (30-40%), pilsner malt and aged (surannes) hops (3 years) are used.  The aged hops are used more for preservative effects than bitterness, and makes actual bitterness levels difficult to estimate.  Traditionally these beers are spontaneously fermented with naturally-occurring yeast and bacteria in predominately oaken barrels.  Home-brewed and craft-brewed versions are more typically made with pure cultures of yeast commonly including Saccharomyces, Brettanomyces, Pediococcus and Lactobacillus in an attempt to recreate the effects of the dominant microbiota of Brussels and the surrounding countryside of the Senne River valley.  Cultures taken from bottles are sometimes used but there is no simple way of knowing what organisms are still viable.
Aroma:
A moderately sour/acidic aroma blends with aromas described as barnyard, earthy, goaty, hay, horsey, and horse blanket.  While some may be more dominantly sour/acidic, balance is the key and denotes a better gueuze.  Commonly fruity with aromas of citrus fruits (often grapefruit), apples or other light fruits, rhubarb, or honey.  A very mild oak aroma is considered favorable.  An enteric, smoky, cigar-like, or cheesy aroma is unfavorable.  No hop aroma.  No diacetyl.
Appearance:
Golden in color.  Clarity is excellent (unless the bottle was shaken).  A thick rocky, mousse-like, white head seems to last forever.  Always effervescent.
Flavor:
A moderately sour/acidic character is classically in balance with the malt, wheat and barnyard characteristics.  A low, complementary sweetness may be present but higher levels are uncharacteristic.  While some may be more dominantly sour, balance is the key and denotes a better gueuze.  A varied fruit flavor is common, and can have a honey-like character.  A mild vanilla and/or oak flavor is occasionally noticeable.  An enteric, smoky or cigar-like character is undesirable.  Hop bitterness is generally absent but a very low hop bitterness may occasionally be perceived.  No hop flavor.  No diacetyl.
Mouthfeel:
Light to medium-light body.  In spite of the low finishing gravity, the many mouth-filling flavors prevent the beer from tasting like water.  Has a low to high tart, puckering quality without being sharply astringent.  Some versions have a low warming character.  Highly carbonated.
Overall Impression:
Complex, pleasantly sour/acidic, balanced, pale, wheat-based ale fermented by a variety of Belgian microbiota.
History:
Spontaneously fermented sour ales from the area in and around Brussels (the Senne Valley) stem from a farmhouse brewing tradition several centuries old.  Their numbers are constantly dwindling and some are untraditionally sweetening their products (post-fermentation) to make them more palatable to a wider audience.
Comments:
Gueuze is traditionally produced by mixing one, two, and three-year old lambic.  “Young” lambic contains fermentable sugars while old lambic has the characteristic “wild” taste of the Senne River valley.  A good gueuze is not the most pungent, but possesses a full and tantalizing bouquet, a sharp aroma, and a soft, velvety flavor.  Lambic is served uncarbonated, while gueuze is served effervescent.
Fruit Lambic
Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.040–1.060  IBUs:up to 10(approx)  FG: 1.000–1.010 SRM: 3 – 7(varies w/fruit)     ABV: 5 – 7%
Ingredients:
Unmalted wheat (30-40%), pilsner malt and aged (surannes) hops (3 years) are used.  The aged hops are used more for preservative effects than bitterness, and makes actual bitterness levels difficult to estimate.  Fruits traditionally used include tart cherries (with pits), raspberries or Muscat grapes.  More recent examples include peaches, apricots or merlot grapes.  Tart or acidic fruit is traditionally used as its purpose is not to sweeten the beer but to add a new dimension.  Traditionally these beers are spontaneously fermented with naturally-occurring yeast and bacteria in predominately oaken barrels.  Home-brewed and craft-brewed versions are more typically made with pure cultures of yeast commonly including Saccharomyces, Brettanomyces, Pediococcus and Lactobacillus in an attempt to recreate the effects of the dominant microbiota of Brussels and the surrounding countryside of the Senne River valley.  Cultures taken from bottles are sometimes used but there is no simple way of knowing what organisms are still viable.
Aroma:
The fruit which has been added to the beer should be the dominant aroma.  A low to moderately sour/acidic character blends with aromas described as barnyard, earthy, goaty, hay, horsey, and horse blanket (and thus should be recognizable as a lambic).  The fruit aroma commonly blends with the other aromas.  An enteric, smoky, cigar-like, or cheesy aroma is unfavorable.  No hop aroma.  No diacetyl.
Appearance:
The variety of fruit generally determines the color though lighter-colored fruit may have little effect on the color.  The color intensity may fade with age.  Clarity is often good, although some fruit will not drop bright.  A thick rocky, mousse-like head, sometimes a shade of fruit, is generally long-lasting.  Always effervescent.
Flavor:
The fruit added to the beer should be evident.  A low to moderate sour and more commonly (sometimes high) acidic character is present.  The classic barnyard characteristics may be low to high.  When young, the beer will present its full fruity taste.  As it ages, the lambic taste will become dominant at the expense of the fruit character—thus fruit lambics are not intended for long aging.  A low, complementary sweetness may be present, but higher levels are uncharacteristic.  A mild vanilla and/or oak flavor is occasionally noticeable.  An enteric, smoky or cigar-like character is undesirable.  Hop bitterness is generally absent.  No hop flavor.  No diacetyl.
Mouthfeel:
Light to medium-light body.  In spite of the low finishing gravity, the many mouth-filling flavors prevent the beer from tasting like water.  Has a low to high tart, puckering quality without being sharply astringent.  Some versions have a low warming character.  Highly carbonated.
Overall Impression:
Complex, fruity, pleasantly sour/acidic, balanced, pale, wheat-based ale fermented by a variety of Belgian microbiota.  A lambic with fruit, not just a fruit beer.
History:
Spontaneously fermented sour ales from the area in and around Brussels (the Senne Valley) stem from a farmhouse brewing tradition several centuries old.  Their numbers are constantly dwindling and some are untraditionally sweetening their products (post-fermentation) with sugar or sweet fruit to make them more palatable to a wider audience.  Fruit was traditionally added to lambic or gueuze, either by the blender or publican, to increase the variety of beers available in local cafes.
Comments:
Fruit-based lambics are often produced like gueuze by mixing one, two, and three-year old lambic.  “Young” lambic contains fermentable sugars while old lambic has the characteristic “wild” taste of the Senne River valley.  Fruit is commonly added halfway through aging and the yeast and bacteria will ferment all sugars from the fruit.  Fruit may also be added to unblended lambic.  The most traditional styles of fruit lambics include kriek (cherries), framboise (raspberries) and druivenlambik (muscat grapes). ENTRANT MUST SPECIFY THE TYPE OF FRUIT(S) USED IN MAKING THE LAMBIC.  Any overly sweet lambics (e.g., Lindemans or Belle Vue clones) would do better entered in the Belgian Specialty category since this category does not describe beers with that character.



About Us : Contact Us : Disclaimer : ©The Brewers Dray 2007-15